My name is Dakota. I'm 21 years old/young. I live in Boise, Idaho. I am currently working as a host at a restaurant. I'm thinking of returning to school this fall. I don't know what I will peruse when I do though. If you have anything that you would like to know feel free to ask.

What I post on this blog, mostly anything and everything. I am going to try and post more personal things as that is the purpose of a blog after all.

15th September 2014

Photo reblogged from NJ Wight Wildlife Photographer with 298 notes

njwight:

This youngster was getting up his nerve…

njwight:

This youngster was getting up his nerve…

15th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from It's Full of Stars with 2,119 notes

fer1972:

To the Stars and Beyond: Space Suit Illustrations by Hernan Chavar  

Source: facebook.com

15th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from ⚡️CHAD⚡️ with 7,577 notes

korra-avatastic:

Let go your earthly tether. Empty, and become wind. 

                                                   -Guru Laghima

Source: korra-avatastic

15th September 2014

Photo reblogged from ⚡️CHAD⚡️ with 226,366 notes

Source: slimgiltsoul

15th September 2014

Photo reblogged from ⚡️CHAD⚡️ with 4,033 notes

Source: cameralink.com

15th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from ⚡️CHAD⚡️ with 164,235 notes

Source: iammyurl

15th September 2014

Photo reblogged from ⚡️CHAD⚡️ with 934 notes

liberalsarecool:

We dont have better CEOs worthy of higher pay, we just have greedier ones that abuse their employees and suck the profits for themselves.
This goes hand in hand with the breaking of labor unions in America.
The Waltons are wealthy off the backs of exploited labor in China and The US.

liberalsarecool:

We dont have better CEOs worthy of higher pay, we just have greedier ones that abuse their employees and suck the profits for themselves.

This goes hand in hand with the breaking of labor unions in America.

The Waltons are wealthy off the backs of exploited labor in China and The US.

Source: liberalsarecool

15th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Do You Hear the People Sing? with 13,148 notes

socialjusticekoolaid:

Today in Solidarity: Family of Mike Brown join protesters outside of STL Courthouse, demanding the immediate arrest of their son’s killer, Officer Darren Wilson.

The grand jury has yet to charge Darren Wilson with anything. Mike Brown’s killer is still a free man, being paid by the taxpayers of the very community he’s terrorized. #staywoke #farfromover

Source: socialjusticekoolaid

15th September 2014

Photo reblogged from ken with 4,277 notes

afro-dominicano:


  Have you heard of Lunar Analemma?
  
  This digital composite image illustrates the changing position and phase of the Moon over the Dali Theater and Museum in Figueres, Spain, during one lunar month.
  
  Analemma is generally known as the motion of the sun in the sky in a complete year. if you follow the position of the Sun at the same time each day, it makes an 8-like trace over the course of a year known as analemma. The position change is caused by the Earth’s motion around the Sun combined with the tilt of the Earth’s rotation axis (see 1, 2, 3). [**]


Analemma of The Moon by Juan Carlos Casado

afro-dominicano:

Have you heard of Lunar Analemma?

This digital composite image illustrates the changing position and phase of the Moon over the Dali Theater and Museum in Figueres, Spain, during one lunar month.

Analemma is generally known as the motion of the sun in the sky in a complete year. if you follow the position of the Sun at the same time each day, it makes an 8-like trace over the course of a year known as analemma. The position change is caused by the Earth’s motion around the Sun combined with the tilt of the Earth’s rotation axis (see 1, 2, 3). [**]

Analemma of The Moon by Juan Carlos Casado

15th September 2014

Photo reblogged from ken with 7,119 notes

afro-dominicano:

afro-dominicano:

Albert Einstein, Civil Rights Activist


  Here’s something you probably don’t know about Albert Einstein.
  
  Image:Einstein with the children of Lincoln University Faculty, May 3, 1946
  
  In 1946, the Nobel Prize-winning physicist traveled to Lincoln University in Pennsylvania, the alma mater of Langston Hughes and Thurgood Marshall and the first school in America to grant college degrees to blacks. At Lincoln, Einstein gave a speech in which he called racism “a disease of white people,” and added, “I do not intend to be quiet about it.” He also received an honorary degree and gave a lecture on relativity to Lincoln students.
  
  The reason Einstein’s visit to Lincoln is not better known is that it was virtually ignored by the mainstream press, which regularly covered Einstein’s speeches and activities. (Only the black press gave extensive coverage to the event.) Nor is there mention of the Lincoln visit in any of the major Einstein biographies or archives.
  
  In fact, many significant details are missing from the numerous studies of Einstein’s life and work, most of them having to do with Einstein’s opposition to racism and his relationships with African Americans.
  
  That these omissions need to be recognized and corrected is the contention of Fred Jerome and Rodger Taylor, authors of “Einstein on Race and Racism” (Rutgers University Press, 2006). Jerome and Taylor spoke April 3 at an event sponsored by the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research. The event also featured remarks by Sylvester James Gates Jr., the John S. Toll Professor of Physics, University of Maryland.
  
  According to Jerome and Taylor, Einstein’s statements at Lincoln were by no means an isolated case. Einstein, who was Jewish, was sensitized to racism by the years of Nazi-inspired threats and harassment he suffered during his tenure at the University of Berlin. Einstein was in the United States when the Nazis came to power in 1933, and, fearful that a return to Germany would place him in mortal danger, he decided to stay, accepting a position at the recently founded Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, N.J. He became an American citizen in 1940.
  
  But while Einstein may have been grateful to have found a safe haven, his gratitude did not prevent him from criticizing the ethical shortcomings of his new home.
  
  “Einstein realized that African Americans in Princeton were treated like Jews in Germany,” said Taylor. “The town was strictly segregated. There was no high school that blacks could go to until the 1940s.”
  
  Einstein’s response to the racism and segregation he found in Princeton (Paul Robeson, who was born in Princeton, called it “the northernmost town in the South”) was to cultivate relationships in the town’s African-American community. Jerome and Taylor interviewed members of that community who still remember the white-haired, disheveled figure of Einstein strolling through their streets, stopping to chat with the inhabitants, and handing out candy to local children.
  
  One woman remembered that Einstein paid the college tuition of a young man from the community. Another said that he invited Marian Anderson to stay at his home when the singer was refused a room at the Nassau Inn.
  
  Einstein met Paul Robeson when the famous singer and actor came to perform at Princeton’s McCarter Theatre in 1935. The two found they had much in common. Both were concerned about the rise of fascism, and both gave their support to efforts to defend the democratically elected government of Spain against the fascist forces of Francisco Franco. Einstein and Robeson also worked together on the American Crusade to End Lynching, in response to an upsurge in racial murders as black soldiers returned home in the aftermath of World War II.
  
  The 20-year friendship between Einstein and Robeson is another story that has not been told, Jerome said, but that omission may soon be rectified. A movie is in the works about the relationship, with Danny Glover slated to play Robeson and Ben Kingsley as Einstein.
  
  Einstein continued to support progressive causes through the 1950s, when the pressure of anti-Communist witch hunts made it dangerous to do so. Another example of Einstein using his prestige to help a prominent African American occurred in 1951, when the 83-year-old W.E.B. Du Bois, a founder of the NAACP, was indicted by the federal government for failing to register as a “foreign agent” as a consequence of circulating the pro-Soviet Stockholm Peace Petition. Einstein offered to appear as a character witness for Du Bois, which convinced the judge to drop the case.
  
  Gates, an African-American physicist who has appeared on the PBS show Nova, said that Einstein had been a hero of his since he learned about the theory of relativity as a teenager, but that he was unaware of Einstein’s ideas on civil rights until fairly recently.
  
  Einstein’s approach to problems in physics was to begin by asking very simple, almost childlike questions, such as, “What would the world look like if I could drive along a beam of light?” Gates said.
  
  “He must have developed his ideas about race through a similar process. He was capable of asking the question, ‘What would my life be like if I were black?’”
  
  Gates said that thinking about Einstein’s involvement with civil rights has prompted him to speculate on the value of affirmative action and the goal of diversity it seeks to bring about. There are many instances in which the presence of strength and resilience in a system can be attributed to diversity.
  
  “In the natural world, for example, when a population is under the influence of a stressful environment, diversity ensures its survival,” Gates said.
  
  On a cultural level, the global influence of American popular music might be attributed to the fact that it is an amalgam of musical traditions from Europe and Africa.
  
  These examples have led him to conclude that “diversity actually matters, independent of the moral argument.” Gates said he believes “there is a science of diversity out there waiting for scholars to discover it.”


p.s. he was also a noted sexist and stole original ideas/works from his wife.

afro-dominicano:

afro-dominicano:

Albert Einstein, Civil Rights Activist

Here’s something you probably don’t know about Albert Einstein.

Image:Einstein with the children of Lincoln University Faculty, May 3, 1946

In 1946, the Nobel Prize-winning physicist traveled to Lincoln University in Pennsylvania, the alma mater of Langston Hughes and Thurgood Marshall and the first school in America to grant college degrees to blacks. At Lincoln, Einstein gave a speech in which he called racism “a disease of white people,” and added, “I do not intend to be quiet about it.” He also received an honorary degree and gave a lecture on relativity to Lincoln students.

The reason Einstein’s visit to Lincoln is not better known is that it was virtually ignored by the mainstream press, which regularly covered Einstein’s speeches and activities. (Only the black press gave extensive coverage to the event.) Nor is there mention of the Lincoln visit in any of the major Einstein biographies or archives.

In fact, many significant details are missing from the numerous studies of Einstein’s life and work, most of them having to do with Einstein’s opposition to racism and his relationships with African Americans.

That these omissions need to be recognized and corrected is the contention of Fred Jerome and Rodger Taylor, authors of “Einstein on Race and Racism” (Rutgers University Press, 2006). Jerome and Taylor spoke April 3 at an event sponsored by the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research. The event also featured remarks by Sylvester James Gates Jr., the John S. Toll Professor of Physics, University of Maryland.

According to Jerome and Taylor, Einstein’s statements at Lincoln were by no means an isolated case. Einstein, who was Jewish, was sensitized to racism by the years of Nazi-inspired threats and harassment he suffered during his tenure at the University of Berlin. Einstein was in the United States when the Nazis came to power in 1933, and, fearful that a return to Germany would place him in mortal danger, he decided to stay, accepting a position at the recently founded Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, N.J. He became an American citizen in 1940.

But while Einstein may have been grateful to have found a safe haven, his gratitude did not prevent him from criticizing the ethical shortcomings of his new home.

“Einstein realized that African Americans in Princeton were treated like Jews in Germany,” said Taylor. “The town was strictly segregated. There was no high school that blacks could go to until the 1940s.”

Einstein’s response to the racism and segregation he found in Princeton (Paul Robeson, who was born in Princeton, called it “the northernmost town in the South”) was to cultivate relationships in the town’s African-American community. Jerome and Taylor interviewed members of that community who still remember the white-haired, disheveled figure of Einstein strolling through their streets, stopping to chat with the inhabitants, and handing out candy to local children.

One woman remembered that Einstein paid the college tuition of a young man from the community. Another said that he invited Marian Anderson to stay at his home when the singer was refused a room at the Nassau Inn.

Einstein met Paul Robeson when the famous singer and actor came to perform at Princeton’s McCarter Theatre in 1935. The two found they had much in common. Both were concerned about the rise of fascism, and both gave their support to efforts to defend the democratically elected government of Spain against the fascist forces of Francisco Franco. Einstein and Robeson also worked together on the American Crusade to End Lynching, in response to an upsurge in racial murders as black soldiers returned home in the aftermath of World War II.

The 20-year friendship between Einstein and Robeson is another story that has not been told, Jerome said, but that omission may soon be rectified. A movie is in the works about the relationship, with Danny Glover slated to play Robeson and Ben Kingsley as Einstein.

Einstein continued to support progressive causes through the 1950s, when the pressure of anti-Communist witch hunts made it dangerous to do so. Another example of Einstein using his prestige to help a prominent African American occurred in 1951, when the 83-year-old W.E.B. Du Bois, a founder of the NAACP, was indicted by the federal government for failing to register as a “foreign agent” as a consequence of circulating the pro-Soviet Stockholm Peace Petition. Einstein offered to appear as a character witness for Du Bois, which convinced the judge to drop the case.

Gates, an African-American physicist who has appeared on the PBS show Nova, said that Einstein had been a hero of his since he learned about the theory of relativity as a teenager, but that he was unaware of Einstein’s ideas on civil rights until fairly recently.

Einstein’s approach to problems in physics was to begin by asking very simple, almost childlike questions, such as, “What would the world look like if I could drive along a beam of light?” Gates said.

“He must have developed his ideas about race through a similar process. He was capable of asking the question, ‘What would my life be like if I were black?’”

Gates said that thinking about Einstein’s involvement with civil rights has prompted him to speculate on the value of affirmative action and the goal of diversity it seeks to bring about. There are many instances in which the presence of strength and resilience in a system can be attributed to diversity.

“In the natural world, for example, when a population is under the influence of a stressful environment, diversity ensures its survival,” Gates said.

On a cultural level, the global influence of American popular music might be attributed to the fact that it is an amalgam of musical traditions from Europe and Africa.

These examples have led him to conclude that “diversity actually matters, independent of the moral argument.” Gates said he believes “there is a science of diversity out there waiting for scholars to discover it.”

p.s. he was also a noted sexist and stole original ideas/works from his wife.

15th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from ken with 2,313 notes

afro-dominicano:

What Makes Tattoos Permanent?

It’s all about the particles in the tattoo ink’s pigment says Dr. Anne Laumann, MBChB, a professor of dermatology at Northwestern University.

Tattoo application uses a mechanized needle to puncture the skin and inject ink into the dermis or second layer of skin just below the epidermis. Since the process involves damaging the skin, the body responds with white blood cells which attempt to absorb the foreign particles and dispose of them in the blood stream.

“The reason pigment stays there is because the pigment particles are too big to be eaten by the white cells, so they just sit there,” Laumann says.

Tattoos have become increasingly popular in recent years. According to a 2010 Pew Research Report, approximately 40 percent of Americans between the ages of 18 and 29 have at least one tattoo.

The problem with tattoos is exactly what makes them so appealing—their permanency. “If you have the name of your boyfriend on there and then you marry somebody else, that’s a problem,” Laumann says.

Tattoos also tend to become problematic with age. Ink can become blurred if injected too deeply into the skin, causing the pigment to migrate beyond the intended area. Fading and distortion due to changes in body shape are also common problems with tattoos. Permanent makeup—or tattoos that resemble eyeliner or other makeup—is a prime example of how these problems can lead to dissatisfaction years after the ink is applied because skin sags and changes shape with age.

“The problem with that is as you get older the shape of the fold of the skin changes,” Laumann says. “So not only does it bleed a bit because the pigment moves gradually over time and so those will tend to become sort of smoky edges, but also the whole line might become a little distorted over the years.”

When a tattoo is no longer desirable, whether it’s faded or causing a bad case of buyer’s regret, you can burn it or cut it out—but the safest and most effective method is a laser treatment.

15th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Scinerds with 1,529 notes

afro-dominicano:

Brain Scans Link Concern for Justice With Reason, Not Emotion


  People who care about justice are swayed more by reason than emotion. That is the unexpected finding of new brain scan research from the University of Chicago department of Psychology and Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience.
  
  Psychologists have found that some individuals react more strongly than others to situations that invoke a sense of justice — for example, seeing a person being treated unfairly, or with mercy. The new study used brain scans to analyze the thought processes of people with high “justice sensitivity.”
  
  “We were interested to examine how individual differences about justice and fairness are represented in the brain to better understand the contribution of emotion and cognition in moral judgment,” explained lead author Jean Decety, the Irving B. Harris Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry.
  
  Using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain-scanning device, the team studied what happened in the participants’ brains as they judged videos depicting behavior that was morally good or bad. For example, they saw a person put money in a beggar’s cup or kick the beggar’s cup away. The participants were asked to rate on a scale how much they would blame or praise the actor seen in the video. People in the study also completed questionnaires that assessed cognitive and emotional empathy, as well as their justice sensitivity.
  
  As expected, study participants who scored high on the justice sensitivity questionnaire assigned significantly more blame when they were evaluating scenes of harm, Decety said. They also registered more praise for scenes showing a person helping another individual.
  
  But the brain imaging also yielded surprises. During the behavior-evaluation exercise, people with high justice sensitivity showed more activity than average participants in parts of the brain associated with higher-order cognition. Brain areas commonly linked with emotional processing were not affected.
  
  The conclusion was clear, Decety said: “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven. Rather, they are cognitively driven.”
  
  According to Decety, one implication is that the search for justice and the moral missions of human rights organizations and others do not come primarily from sentimental motivations, as they are often portrayed. Instead, that drive may have more to do with sophisticated analysis and mental calculation.
  
  Decety adds that evaluating good actions elicited relatively high activity in the region of the brain involved in decision-making, motivation and rewards. This finding suggests that perhaps individuals make judgments about behavior based on how they process the reward value of good actions as compared to bad actions.
  
  “Our results provide some of the first evidence for the role of justice sensitivity in enhancing neural processing of moral information in specific components of the brain network involved in moral judgment,” Decety said.
  
  UChicago Psychology doctoral student Keith Yoder is a co-author on the paper, which was published in the March 19 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

afro-dominicano:

Brain Scans Link Concern for Justice With Reason, Not Emotion

People who care about justice are swayed more by reason than emotion. That is the unexpected finding of new brain scan research from the University of Chicago department of Psychology and Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience.

Psychologists have found that some individuals react more strongly than others to situations that invoke a sense of justice — for example, seeing a person being treated unfairly, or with mercy. The new study used brain scans to analyze the thought processes of people with high “justice sensitivity.”

“We were interested to examine how individual differences about justice and fairness are represented in the brain to better understand the contribution of emotion and cognition in moral judgment,” explained lead author Jean Decety, the Irving B. Harris Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry.

Using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain-scanning device, the team studied what happened in the participants’ brains as they judged videos depicting behavior that was morally good or bad. For example, they saw a person put money in a beggar’s cup or kick the beggar’s cup away. The participants were asked to rate on a scale how much they would blame or praise the actor seen in the video. People in the study also completed questionnaires that assessed cognitive and emotional empathy, as well as their justice sensitivity.

As expected, study participants who scored high on the justice sensitivity questionnaire assigned significantly more blame when they were evaluating scenes of harm, Decety said. They also registered more praise for scenes showing a person helping another individual.

But the brain imaging also yielded surprises. During the behavior-evaluation exercise, people with high justice sensitivity showed more activity than average participants in parts of the brain associated with higher-order cognition. Brain areas commonly linked with emotional processing were not affected.

The conclusion was clear, Decety said: “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven. Rather, they are cognitively driven.”

According to Decety, one implication is that the search for justice and the moral missions of human rights organizations and others do not come primarily from sentimental motivations, as they are often portrayed. Instead, that drive may have more to do with sophisticated analysis and mental calculation.

Decety adds that evaluating good actions elicited relatively high activity in the region of the brain involved in decision-making, motivation and rewards. This finding suggests that perhaps individuals make judgments about behavior based on how they process the reward value of good actions as compared to bad actions.

“Our results provide some of the first evidence for the role of justice sensitivity in enhancing neural processing of moral information in specific components of the brain network involved in moral judgment,” Decety said.

UChicago Psychology doctoral student Keith Yoder is a co-author on the paper, which was published in the March 19 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

Source: sciencedaily.com

15th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Laboratory Equipment with 3,644 notes

malformalady:

The Gouldian finch are small, brightly colored birds with green backs, yellow bellies, and purple breasts  with a light blue uppertail and a cream undertail. Sometimes called lady gouldians, their facial color can vary, but black is the most common. Gouldian finch chicks are equipped with blue phosphorescent beads along their mouths, making it easy for the parents to feed them in the darkness of the nest cavity.
Photo credit: Greg Grall/National Aquarium

malformalady:

The Gouldian finch are small, brightly colored birds with green backs, yellow bellies, and purple breasts  with a light blue uppertail and a cream undertail. Sometimes called lady gouldians, their facial color can vary, but black is the most common. Gouldian finch chicks are equipped with blue phosphorescent beads along their mouths, making it easy for the parents to feed them in the darkness of the nest cavity.

Photo credit: Greg Grall/National Aquarium

Source: malformalady

15th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Shychemist with 763 notes

magicalnaturetour:

New Holland Honeyeater (by birdsaspoetry)

magicalnaturetour:

New Holland Honeyeater (by birdsaspoetry)

Tagged: MAJESTIC BIRB

Source: Flickr / birdsaspoetry

15th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Shychemist with 194,692 notes

unicornsandbutane:

bulletproof-fantasy:

enjorlove:

pardonmewhileipanic:

thotbotsuperstar:

dynastylnoire:

perpetualdaydream:

baskintheafterglow:

expect-the-greatest:

champagnexstrawberrykisses:

expect-the-greatest:

Bruh

What the hell?

Niggas out here trappin women

Then wonder how your ass got burned

what the fuck…

I’ve had a dude do that before. that shit is terrifying. Dude went across the room like he typically would to get one. Came back and I didn’t know that he didn’t have one until he pulled out.
I FLIPPED. Cried all the way home. Cried for days. Got tested. Bought the morning after pill. Seriously, fuck dudes that do this. There should be laws against it.

There ARE laws against this. It’s called rape by deception or fraudulent rape and basically, it’s anytime the conditions of your consent are compromised. In a situation like this, you consented to protected sex. By having sex in a way you did not consent to, a crime WAS committed and he could be charged if any physical effects like pregnancy or STD occurred. Remember, ANY SEXUAL ACTIVITY YOU DON’T CONSENT TO IS RAPE. 

If a guy does this, it’s rape. Call the cops. Ruin his life since he has no problem risking yours. Make him fucking learn. Rapists belong in jail. Rape by deception is rape, not a funny “meme”. 

This is incredibly important for everyone to see!! EVERYONE

yes YOU NEED THIS ON YOUR DASH EVERYONE

y’all should see this, just so you know.
Call the cops.
HERE is a list of crisis hotlines for rape and abuse. Most of them are 24/7 hotlines. 
HERE is a list of crisis hotlines by state. 
In addition to giving you the compassion your rapist clearly won’t, they might be able to advise you on possible next steps: what to tell the police, how to get a test done.
Stay safe, everyone. 

unicornsandbutane:

bulletproof-fantasy:

enjorlove:

pardonmewhileipanic:

thotbotsuperstar:

dynastylnoire:

perpetualdaydream:

baskintheafterglow:

expect-the-greatest:

champagnexstrawberrykisses:

expect-the-greatest:

Bruh

What the hell?

Niggas out here trappin women

Then wonder how your ass got burned

what the fuck…

I’ve had a dude do that before. that shit is terrifying. Dude went across the room like he typically would to get one. Came back and I didn’t know that he didn’t have one until he pulled out.

I FLIPPED. Cried all the way home. Cried for days. Got tested. Bought the morning after pill. Seriously, fuck dudes that do this. There should be laws against it.

There ARE laws against this. It’s called rape by deception or fraudulent rape and basically, it’s anytime the conditions of your consent are compromised. In a situation like this, you consented to protected sex. By having sex in a way you did not consent to, a crime WAS committed and he could be charged if any physical effects like pregnancy or STD occurred. Remember, ANY SEXUAL ACTIVITY YOU DON’T CONSENT TO IS RAPE. 

If a guy does this, it’s rape. Call the cops. Ruin his life since he has no problem risking yours. Make him fucking learn. Rapists belong in jail. Rape by deception is rape, not a funny “meme”. 

This is incredibly important for everyone to see!! EVERYONE

yes YOU NEED THIS ON YOUR DASH EVERYONE

y’all should see this, just so you know.

Call the cops.

HERE is a list of crisis hotlines for rape and abuse. Most of them are 24/7 hotlines. 

HERE is a list of crisis hotlines by state. 

In addition to giving you the compassion your rapist clearly won’t, they might be able to advise you on possible next steps: what to tell the police, how to get a test done.

Stay safe, everyone. 

Tagged: tw: rapedon't be that guy

Source: tupacmadaddy