My name is Dakota. I'm 21 years old/young. I live in Boise, Idaho. I am currently working as a host at a restaurant. I'm thinking of returning to school this fall. I don't know what I will peruse when I do though. If you have anything that you would like to know feel free to ask.

What I post on this blog, mostly anything and everything. I am going to try and post more personal things as that is the purpose of a blog after all.

30th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from It's Okay To Be Smart with 2,080 notes

sagansense:

child-of-thecosmos:

Radio and television broadcasting may be only a brief passing phase in our technological development. When we imagine alien civilizations broadcasting signals with radio telescopes, are we any different from earlier generations who imagined riding cannon shells to the moon? Civilizations even slightly more advanced than ours may have already moved on to some other mode of communication, one that we have yet to discover or even imagine. Their messages could be swirling all around us at this very moment, but we lack the means to perceive them just as all of our ancestors, up to a little more than a century ago, would have been oblivious to the most urgent radio signal from another world. 

But there’s another more troubling possibility: Civilizations, like other living things, may only live so long before perishing due to natural causes, or violence, or self-inflicted wounds. Whether or not we ever make contact with intelligent alien life may depend on a critical question: What is the life expectancy of a civilization?

- Episode 11: The Immortals, Cosmos: A SpaceTime Odyssey

Recommended reading:

Everything you need to know about this book can be found in this wonderfully thorough review by Astrobiology Magazine from 2003.

I plan on doing a full writeup/review about this book; however, I can tell you it’s one of the best Carl’s ever written and is still heavily referenced by scientists across multiple fields regarding the search for extraterrestrial life, be it intelligent or otherwise. A review on the book and the study of astrobiology itself can be via a PDF by Charley Lineweaver of the Planetary Science Institute at the Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics and the Research School of Earth Sciences.

The most fascinating aspect of this book is that it was originally written by I.S. Shklovskii in Russian, re-translated into English, whereby Carl adds his scientific “two-cents”, expanding on subjects and explaining further in a way only Carl, himself, can. For instance, the last paragraph in Chapter 31: Interstellar contact by automatic probe vehicles:

At this point in the Russian edition of the present work, Shklovskii expresses his belief that civilizations are not inevitably doomed to self-destruction, despite his description of contemporary Western literature as filled with details of atomic holocaust. He expresses his belief that as long as capitalism exists on Earth, a violent end to intelligent life on the planet is probable. There is reason to assume, he asserts, that future peaceful societies will be constructed on the basis of Communism. I am able to imagine alternative scenarios for the future. No one today lives in a society which closely resembles Adam Smith capitalism or Karl Marx communism. The political dichotomies of the twentieth century may seem to our remote descendants no more exhaustive of the range of possibilities for the entire future of mankind than do, for us, the alternatives of the European religious wars of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. As Shklovskii says, the forces of peace in the world are great. Mankind is not likely to destroy itself. There is too much left to do.

Also recommended:

SETI Scientist Jill Tarter provided a beautiful TED Talk about this subject, and in this interview with NOVA, she speaks on being the inspiration for Carl Sagan and Ann Druyan’s book/film ‘Contact’ whereby Jodie Foster portrays Dr. Tarter.

Seth Shostak, Senior Astronomer for SETI, presented an enriching TED Talk about why he’s convinced we’re closer than ever in detecting, contacting, or receiving signals from ETI; and recently, had a Q&A conversation with Science 2.0 appropriately titled “Why I Believe We’ll Find Aliens.”

…stay curious.

Source: child-of-thecosmos

30th August 2014

Post reblogged from gravy with 6,957 notes

jobhaver:

some nerd: communism will never work because human nature

me: image

Source: jobhaver

30th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from ARCHI/TECTURA with 148 notes

Tagged: favorite

30th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from SUBTILITAS with 299 notes

subtilitas:

Barclay & Crousse - Equis houseCañete 2003.

Tagged: architectureBarclay Croussehouseconcreteperu

30th August 2014

Photo reblogged from you will never be glamour with 26,739 notes

Source: makemeasammichyo

30th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from LocalCreature with 15,224 notes

Source: sizvideos

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Shychemist with 33,824 notes

dreadpiratekhan:

A Swedish woman hitting a neo-Nazi protester with her handbag. The woman was reportedly a concentration camp survivor. [1985]

Volunteers learn how to fight fires at Pearl Harbor [c. 1941 - 1945]

A 106-year old Armenian woman protecting her home with an AK-47. [1990]

Komako Kimura, a prominent Japanese suffragist at a march in New York. [October 23, 1917]

Erika, a 15-year-old Hungarian fighter who fought for freedom against the Soviet Union. [October 1956]

Sarla Thakral, 21 years old, the first Indian woman to earn a pilot license. [1936]

Voting activist Annie Lumpkins at the Little Rock city jail. [1961]  
(freakin’ immaculate)
Source with more wonderful photos

dreadpiratekhan:


A Swedish woman hitting a neo-Nazi protester with her handbag. The woman was reportedly a concentration camp survivor. [1985]

Volunteers learn how to fight fires at Pearl Harbor [c. 1941 - 1945]

A 106-year old Armenian woman protecting her home with an AK-47. [1990]

Komako Kimura, a prominent Japanese suffragist at a march in New York. [October 23, 1917]

Erika, a 15-year-old Hungarian fighter who fought for freedom against the Soviet Union. [October 1956]

Sarla Thakral, 21 years old, the first Indian woman to earn a pilot license. [1936]

Voting activist Annie Lumpkins at the Little Rock city jail. [1961]  

(freakin’ immaculate)

Source with more wonderful photos

Source: dreadpiratekhan

29th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from Shychemist with 57,549 notes

bogleech:

florafaunagifs:

Leaf bug (Phyllium giganteum)

The constant wobbling as they move is a part of their disguise, making it seem as though the “leaf” is only moving because of a light breeze.

If you blow on one it will also shake around in the hopes of matching any actual surrounding leaves

Source: florafaunagifs

29th August 2014

Post reblogged from Shychemist with 26,007 notes

hot4triangle:

kyrianne:

thatemilyperson:

kyrianne:

I am not okay with the lack of continuity for Goofy’s real name

image

I don’t know what I was expecting, but this is bullshit.

I AM NOT OKAY WITH THE LACK OF CONTINUITY

goofy changes his name ever few years for the purpose of tax evasion, he has been dodging the government for well over half a century and owes hardworking american citizens hundreds of thousands of dollars in back taxes

Source: kyrianne

29th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from Exploratorium with 330,349 notes

exploratorium:

Perception and perspective!

Source: sizvideos

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from PAX AMERICANA with 8,538 notes

setbabiesonfire:

cyclivist:

Deputy who killed former Napster COO after drifting into the bike lane while distracted by his laptop will not face charges because he was answering a work-related email.

OH OKAY.

setbabiesonfire:

cyclivist:

Deputy who killed former Napster COO after drifting into the bike lane while distracted by his laptop will not face charges because he was answering a work-related email.

OH OKAY.

Source: cyclivist

29th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from Shychemist with 78 notes

mindblowingscience:

Absurd Creature of the Week: The 100-Foot Sea Critter That Deploys a Net of Death

As far as conjoined twins go, they don’t come more famous than Chang and Eng Bunker, who in the 1800s traveled the world lecturing and generally being gawked at by rubes. They even gave us the term Siamese twins (they were from Siam, which is now Thailand). Eventually they settled down on a farm in North Carolina, married two sisters (uh…), and between them sired 21 children.

The logistics of that seem, well, a bit complicated, if not entirely awkward. There are conjoined twins in our oceans, though, that pull off something far more remarkable. These are the siphonophores, some 180 known species of gelatinous strings that can grow to 100 feet long, making them some of the longest critters on the planet. But instead of growing as a single body like virtually every other animal, siphonophores clone themselves thousands of times over into half a dozen different types of specialized cloned bodies, all strung together to work as a team—a very deadly team at that.

“In a way these specialized bodies function as organs,” said marine biologist Stefan Siebert of Brown University, who studies these glorious creatures with the help of remotely operated vehicles from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. “Some move the colony, some feed for the colony, some take care of reproduction.” Whereas creatures like you and me have over millennia evolved different parts of our bodies to work as organs, siphonophores have evolved individual bodiesthemselves into organs. It’s a bit like your liver up and declaring independence from the rest of you, even though it can’t go anywhere.

Continue Reading.

Tagged: science

Source: Wired

29th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from A Momentary Flow with 349 notes

wildcat2030:

A Complicated Question
A child asks, and war answers.

go see all of it.. brilliant!

(via A Complicated Question - Issue 16: Nothingness - Nautilus)

29th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from Truth with 233,072 notes

sandandglass:

Daily Show correspondent Michael Che tries to find a safe place to report from.

Source: sandandglass

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from fauna with 529 notes

libutron:

San Rafael - Condor Agate | ©Uwe Reier
Discovered in 1992 by the former Argentinean actor, Luis de los Santos, the Condor Agate comes from a difficult-to-reach 7,000-foot elevated plateau near San Rafael, in Mendoza Province, Argentina. The site can only be reached by horse back.
The agate’s bright reds and yellows are made even more vivid by their contrasting bands of cooler, more-subtle hues. This agate was named after the large Condor birds that were flying over Luis de los Santos during the trip that he discovered the agate.
Locality: San Rafael, Argentina.
Reference: [1]

libutron:

San Rafael - Condor Agate | ©Uwe Reier

Discovered in 1992 by the former Argentinean actor, Luis de los Santos, the Condor Agate comes from a difficult-to-reach 7,000-foot elevated plateau near San Rafael, in Mendoza Province, Argentina. The site can only be reached by horse back.

The agate’s bright reds and yellows are made even more vivid by their contrasting bands of cooler, more-subtle hues. This agate was named after the large Condor birds that were flying over Luis de los Santos during the trip that he discovered the agate.

Locality: San Rafael, Argentina.

Reference: [1]

Source: libutron