My name is Dakota. I'm 21 years old/young. I live in Boise, Idaho. I am currently working as a host at a restaurant. I'm thinking of returning to school this fall. I don't know what I will peruse when I do though. If you have anything that you would like to know feel free to ask.

What I post on this blog, mostly anything and everything. I am going to try and post more personal things as that is the purpose of a blog after all.

23rd July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Ⓐnarcho Queer with 10,428 notes

thebowspring:

Palestinian children return to school (24 November 2012) for the first time since Israel’s latest attack on Gaza but not all students made it back. Sarah Al-Dalou had to be excused from class as she — along with 9 other members of her family and 2 neighbors [graphic] — were killed by an Israeli airstrike when F-16 fighter jets reduced their house in the Sheikh Radwan neighborhood in Gaza to rubble.

A sign now occupies her seat instead, calling her a ‘martyr’. She was one of 34 children killed by the Israeli Army during their week-long assault on the blockaded coastal enclave, with 161 Palestinians dead in total.

(Photo source: @mohammednazmi)

Bottom photo: Palestinian children return to school in January 2009 after Israel’s massacre in Gaza, named ‘Operation Cast Lead’, when over 300 children were killed by the Israeli Army, and 1,400 Palestinians in all.

Signs replaced the once-occupied seats at al-Fakhura School in the Jabaliya refugee camp in Gaza; names of victims written under the word in red: ‘Martyr’, 24 January, 2009.

(Photo credit: Anja Niedringhaus / AP)

Source: thebowspring

22nd July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Shychemist with 2,615 notes

biomorphosis:

Raccoon dogs look very similar to raccoons but have no genetic similarities between them. They belong to the Canidae family, which are known to have distinct dog and wolf like characteristics and appearance. These animals are both carnivorous and omnivorous mammals.

They are monogamous and will mate for life. It is only if the mate dies or is killed, will the other search for a new mate. Two mates will hibernate in one den. During this period they will maintain close body contact to keep each other warm and will groom each other as well. This is a trait not practiced by canines, as dogs neither hibernate and nor are they monogamous in nature.

Tagged: science

Source: biomorphosis

22nd July 2014

Photo reblogged from Shychemist with 58,129 notes

gallifreyan-gallimaufry:

leda74:

therothwoman:

beowulfstits-archive:

I want to go to this exact point and run around it saying “I’m in Sweden!” I’m in Finland!” “I’m in Norway!” until I get tired
i aspire to great things in life

According to Google Maps, that point is in the middle of a small lake.

So we’ll do it in January when it’s frozen.

actually that’s why they’ve helpfully dropped a big-ass cement block with a bridge surrounding it in the middle of the lake: for the express purpose of doing what OP aspires to do

gallifreyan-gallimaufry:

leda74:

therothwoman:

beowulfstits-archive:

I want to go to this exact point and run around it saying “I’m in Sweden!” I’m in Finland!” “I’m in Norway!” until I get tired

i aspire to great things in life

According to Google Maps, that point is in the middle of a small lake.

So we’ll do it in January when it’s frozen.

actually that’s why they’ve helpfully dropped a big-ass cement block with a bridge surrounding it in the middle of the lake: for the express purpose of doing what OP aspires to do

Source: beowulfstits-archive

22nd July 2014

Photo reblogged from Shychemist with 103 notes

thenewenlightenmentage:

Transiting exoplanet with longest known year
Astronomers have discovered a transiting exoplanet with the longest known year. Kepler-421b circles its star once every 704 days. In comparison, Mars orbits our Sun once every 780 days. Most of the 1,800-plus exoplanets discovered to date are much closer to their stars and have much shorter orbital periods.
"Finding Kepler-421b was a stroke of luck," says lead author David Kipping of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA). "The farther a planet is from its star, the less likely it is to transit the star from Earth’s point of view. It has to line up just right."
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

Transiting exoplanet with longest known year

Astronomers have discovered a transiting exoplanet with the longest known year. Kepler-421b circles its star once every 704 days. In comparison, Mars orbits our Sun once every 780 days. Most of the 1,800-plus exoplanets discovered to date are much closer to their stars and have much shorter orbital periods.

"Finding Kepler-421b was a stroke of luck," says lead author David Kipping of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA). "The farther a planet is from its star, the less likely it is to transit the star from Earth’s point of view. It has to line up just right."

Continue Reading

Tagged: science

Source: phys.org

22nd July 2014

Photo reblogged from like a physicist with 13,147 notes

fishnetandfundip:

captainjaneways-bitch:

rainbowshooterunicornsummoner:

An explanation of what radians measure: the angle in terms of the radius curved around the circle.

holy fucking shit, my entire education has just clicked.

I love seeing things click for other people (especially in math). That instant exhilaration is the reason math and science are fun for me.

fishnetandfundip:

captainjaneways-bitch:

rainbowshooterunicornsummoner:

An explanation of what radians measure: the angle in terms of the radius curved around the circle.

holy fucking shit, my entire education has just clicked.

I love seeing things click for other people (especially in math). That instant exhilaration is the reason math and science are fun for me.

Source: xysciences

22nd July 2014

Photo reblogged from Drueisms with 96 notes

zerostatereflex:

The Event Horizon
Friction of molecules swirling around a black hole produce the densest, hottest and most electrically charged environment anywhere in the known universe. The event horizon, in relativity, is a boundary in space-time beyond which events cannot affect an outside observer. Doesn’t sound to crazy right?
And because our very lives are only composed of things that are relative to each other, it’s almost like a form of matter death, though it doesn’t stop for the black hole, as it does for us. 
The forces that can take matter and crush it out of existence are amazing.

zerostatereflex:

The Event Horizon

Friction of molecules swirling around a black hole produce the densest, hottest and most electrically charged environment anywhere in the known universe. The event horizon, in relativity, is a boundary in space-time beyond which events cannot affect an outside observer. Doesn’t sound to crazy right?

And because our very lives are only composed of things that are relative to each other, it’s almost like a form of matter death, though it doesn’t stop for the black hole, as it does for us. 

The forces that can take matter and crush it out of existence are amazing.

Source: youtube.com

22nd July 2014

Photoset reblogged from The Gasoline Station with 670 notes

gasoline-station:

Iconic Houses

Design/Animation: Matteo Muci (Artist on Tumblr Here)

GIF: The Gasoline Station

Tagged: DesignMatteo MuciThe Gasoline StationArtists on TumblrGIFArchitectureIllustration

22nd July 2014

Photoset reblogged from The Gasoline Station with 442 notes

gasoline-station:

Air India

Photographer Amos Chapple’s remarkable aerial views of India were shot by attaching his camera to a ‘quadcopter’ drone`

Pictures: Amos Chapple

Source: The Guardian

Tagged: Architecture EditorAmos ChappleLandscapeArchitectureCityscapeAerialIndia

22nd July 2014

Photo reblogged from Laughing Squid with 314 notes

laughingsquid:

MIT Student Creates a Robot That Plays Connect Four for a Course Final

laughingsquid:

MIT Student Creates a Robot That Plays Connect Four for a Course Final

Tagged: Tech

22nd July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Shychemist with 835 notes

zerostatereflex:

Squishy Robots

"A new phase-changing material built from wax and foam developed by researchers at MIT is capable of switching between hard and soft states."

MIT researchers are trying to change the paradigm of your typical robot by mimicking organic substances. The idea is that the robot should be soft to conform to a particular environment, and interact with humans, though rigid enough to actually do a procedure. They can achieve this by applying heat at particular points to deform the object, then applying coolness to make the object rigid again. 

"Robots built from this material would be able to operate more like biological systems with applications ranging from difficult search and rescue operations, squeezing through rubble looking for survivors, to deformable surgical robots that could move through the body to reach a particular point without damaging any of the organs or vessels along the way."

The last gif is a example of bendable articulation. :D 

Tagged: science

Source: youtube.com

22nd July 2014

Post

I don’t know what to do about this boy.

Tagged: personali don't feel like typing about it right now

21st July 2014

Photoset reblogged from remash with 129 notes

remash:

lenscape ~ kine solberg

Tagged: designarchitecturesculpturewindowsglassdistortionlenses

21st July 2014

Photoset reblogged from A Momentary Flow with 215 notes

wildcat2030:

A North Korean Architect’s Crazy Visions of the Future
-
It’s difficult for anyone to imagine the future. But what if you were largely unfamiliar with the present? That’s the fascination at the heart of “Commissions for Utopia,” a series of futuristic scenes of North Korea dreamed up by one of the country’s promising young architects. The illustrations, currently on view at the Venice Architecture Biennale in Italy, show the buildings of tomorrow as envisioned by someone with little exposure to the architecture of today. In the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, “architect” is a government job. There are no private projects, and young North Korean architects come out of school with only a faint understanding of the field as it exists outside their deeply isolated country. Recently, however, one young architect was given a rare chance at an outside commission by a client named Nick Bonner. Bonner holds the unusual distinction of operating the most popular tourist agency to the least-visited country in the world. Born in Britain and trained as a landscape architect, he founded Koryo Tours in Beijing in 1993. Today, the company takes over two thousand tourists into North Korea a year—more than half of all the foreigners who visit. (via A North Korean Architect’s Crazy Visions of the Future | Design | WIRED)

Tagged: Architecturevisionfuture

21st July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Maschinenmensch with 95,380 notes

Source: sandandglass

21st July 2014

Photo reblogged from Scinerds with 169 notes

afro-dominicano:

World’s Biggest Laser Blasts Diamond to Simulate Planet Cores


  The biggest laser in the world was used to crush a diamond, offering insights into how the hardest known material behaves when it is exposed to extremely high pressures. The experiment could also reveal new clues about what happens at the cores of giant planets, where conditions of intense atmospheric pressures exist.
  
  Researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California, led by physicist Raymond Smith, blasted a sliver of diamond with a laser beam at a pressure of 725 million pounds per square inch (51 million kilograms per square centimeter). This is the kind of pressure found near the core of giant planets, such as Jupiter or huge, rocky bodies known as “super-Earths.”
  
  The entire experiment took only 25 billionths of a second. The researchers fired 176 laser beams at a small cylinder of gold, called a hohlraum, with a tiny chip of synthetic diamond embedded in it. When the laser beams hit the cylinder, the energy was converted to X-rays. The hohlraum was vaporized, and in the process, the diamond was exposed to pressures tens of millions of times Earth’s atmospheric pressure.
  
  Theoretical calculations predicted that such high pressures should cause a diamond to change its crystal structure. One way to test if this is true is to measure the speed of sound waves in a material. If this speed changes abruptly as the pressure goes up, then the diamond structure has rearranged itself.
  
  But that didn’t happen — the velocity of sound waves changed smoothly.
  
  "If there was a phase transformation you’d expect a discontinuity," Smith said.
  
  The rate of change in the diamond’s density also didn’t match up with earlier theoretical models. Materials typically become denser at high pressures, and diamond is no exception. But how fast its density changed was a surprise, the researchers said.
  
  The experiment was a breakthrough, in that instead of smacking the diamond with high pressure in a stepwise fashion, such as hitting it with successively heavier hammers, the researchers were able to boost the pressure smoothly. This enabled them to crush the diamond and expose it to intense pressure without the substance becoming too hot and melting. (Diamonds can and do melt at sufficiently high temperatures).
  
  Since diamonds are made of carbon, understanding how this material behaves at high pressures can be important in the study of planets around other stars, said Nikku (Madhu) Madhusudhan, a professor of astrophysics at the University of Cambridge.

afro-dominicano:

World’s Biggest Laser Blasts Diamond to Simulate Planet Cores

The biggest laser in the world was used to crush a diamond, offering insights into how the hardest known material behaves when it is exposed to extremely high pressures. The experiment could also reveal new clues about what happens at the cores of giant planets, where conditions of intense atmospheric pressures exist.

Researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California, led by physicist Raymond Smith, blasted a sliver of diamond with a laser beam at a pressure of 725 million pounds per square inch (51 million kilograms per square centimeter). This is the kind of pressure found near the core of giant planets, such as Jupiter or huge, rocky bodies known as “super-Earths.”

The entire experiment took only 25 billionths of a second. The researchers fired 176 laser beams at a small cylinder of gold, called a hohlraum, with a tiny chip of synthetic diamond embedded in it. When the laser beams hit the cylinder, the energy was converted to X-rays. The hohlraum was vaporized, and in the process, the diamond was exposed to pressures tens of millions of times Earth’s atmospheric pressure.

Theoretical calculations predicted that such high pressures should cause a diamond to change its crystal structure. One way to test if this is true is to measure the speed of sound waves in a material. If this speed changes abruptly as the pressure goes up, then the diamond structure has rearranged itself.

But that didn’t happen — the velocity of sound waves changed smoothly.

"If there was a phase transformation you’d expect a discontinuity," Smith said.

The rate of change in the diamond’s density also didn’t match up with earlier theoretical models. Materials typically become denser at high pressures, and diamond is no exception. But how fast its density changed was a surprise, the researchers said.

The experiment was a breakthrough, in that instead of smacking the diamond with high pressure in a stepwise fashion, such as hitting it with successively heavier hammers, the researchers were able to boost the pressure smoothly. This enabled them to crush the diamond and expose it to intense pressure without the substance becoming too hot and melting. (Diamonds can and do melt at sufficiently high temperatures).

Since diamonds are made of carbon, understanding how this material behaves at high pressures can be important in the study of planets around other stars, said Nikku (Madhu) Madhusudhan, a professor of astrophysics at the University of Cambridge.

Tagged: scienceastrophysicsastronomyphysicsdiamond

Source: livescience.com