My name is Dakota. I'm 21 years old/young. I live in Boise, Idaho. I am currently working as a host at a restaurant. I'm thinking of returning to school this fall. I don't know what I will peruse when I do though. If you have anything that you would like to know feel free to ask.

What I post on this blog, mostly anything and everything. I am going to try and post more personal things as that is the purpose of a blog after all.

2nd September 2014

Photo reblogged from Shychemist with 353 notes

realmonstrosities:

bogleech:

This SEM photo of a hookworm’s head is so beautiful and vivid I thought I was looking at a digital painting. I want to frame this on the wall.
Hookworms are precious

I would call this “joyfully satisfied”.

realmonstrosities:

bogleech:

This SEM photo of a hookworm’s head is so beautiful and vivid I thought I was looking at a digital painting. I want to frame this on the wall.

Hookworms are precious

I would call this “joyfully satisfied”.

Source: bogleech

2nd September 2014

Photo reblogged from LocalCreature with 269 notes

marwahthemuslim:

Gaza today, September 1, 2014.

marwahthemuslim:

Gaza today, September 1, 2014.

Source: marwahthemuslim

2nd September 2014

Photoset reblogged from BLOGGING via TYPEWRITER. with 280 notes

inothernews:

ICE, ICE, BABY  For years, Death Valley presented visitors with a mystery: those of the famed “sliding rocks.”  What made these small boulders seemingly glide across the playa, leaving tilled soil tracks in their wake?  The answer appears in the scientific journal PLOS One: a layer of ice, and a push from the wind.  Nature’s game of curling, we’d guess.  (Photos [from top]: Richard Norris / Jim Norris / Michael Hartman via The New York Times)

2nd September 2014

Photoset reblogged from sup nerds with 13,882 notes

pemsylvania:

superlongscarf:

Current length:

104’ .5”

WOW! 100 feet down! Only …..5300 more to go. Oh boy. This might take a while.

im following this blog where this person is trying to knit a mile long scarf this is amazing and deserves more attention

Source: superlongscarf

1st September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Gravity. It's the law. with 1,938 notes

thatscienceguy:

John Conway first theorized that it would be impossible to create a forever-expanding universe using these rules, which was proven wrong by a team at MIT, creating the “glider gun,” which is featured in the third gif. 

Since then, thanks to computers, people all over the world have added new designs to the database, creating amazingly complex designs.

For example Andrew J. Wade created a design which replicates itself every 34 million generations! Furthermore it is also a spaceship (permanently moving pattern) and not only that, it was also the first spaceship that did not travel purely diagonally or horizontally/vertically! These types of spaceships are now appropriately named Knightships.

The simulation has some interesting properties, for example it has a theoretical maximum speed information can travel. Or simply, light speed - as that is the limit in our own universe. The limit is set to 1 cell per generation - after all how can you create something further than 1 cell away in one generation if you can only effect your immediate neighbours? And yet you can get things like the ‘stargate’ (Love the name, huge SG fan here.) which allows a space ship to travel 11 cells in just 6 generations.

Some smart people have even designed calculators, prime number generators and other incredibly complex patterns.

You can create your own patterns here: http://www.bitstorm.org/gameoflife/

All gifs were made from this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2vgICfQawE

Source: thatscienceguy

1st September 2014

Photo reblogged from Shychemist with 87 notes

mindblowingscience:

Faster, cheaper tests for sickle cell disease

Within minutes after birth, every child in the U.S. undergoes a battery of tests designed to diagnose a host of conditions, including sickle cell disease. Thousands of children born in the developing world, however, aren’t so lucky, meaning many suffer and die from the disease each year.

A.J. Kumar hopes to put a halt to at least some of those deaths.
A Post-Doctoral Fellow in Chemistry and Chemical Biology working in the lab of George Whitesides, the Woodford L. and Ann A. Flowers University Professor, Kumar and colleagues, including other co-authors, have developed a new test for sickle cell disease that provides results in just 12 minutes and costs as little as 50 cents – far faster and cheaper than other tests. The test is described in a paper published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
"The tests we have today work great, they have a very high sensitivity," Kumar said. "But the equipment needed to run them costs in the tens of thousands of dollars, and they take hours to run. That’s not amenable to rural clinics, or even some cities where the medical infrastructure isn’t up to the standards we see in the U.S. That’s where having a rapid, low-cost test becomes important and this paper shows such a test can potentially work."
When run against more than 50 clinical samples – 26 positive and 26 negative – the new test showed good sensitivity and specificity for the disease, Kumar said, so the early evidence is promising, but additional testing will be needed to determine whether the test is truly accurate enough to use in the field.
The test designed by Kumar is deceptively simple, and works by connecting two ideas scientists have understood for decades.

The first is the notion that blood cells affected by the disease are denser than normal cells, and the second is that many polymers, when mixed in water, automatically separate into layers ordered by density.
Conventional methods to separate cells by density relied on layering liquids with different density by hand. The insight, arrived at by Charles Mace (now at Tufts) and Kumar, was that the self-forming layers could be used to separate cells, such as red blood cells, by density.
"When you mix the polymers with water, they separate just like oil and water," he said. "Even if you mix it up, it will still come back to those layers."
It wasn’t until a chance meeting with Dr. Thomas Stossel, however, that Kumar believed the technology might have a real impact on sickle cell disease.
"Initially, we started off working on malaria, because we thought when parasites invaded the cells, it would change their density," he said. "But when I met Tom Stossel on a panel at the Harvard Medical School, he said, ‘You need to work on sickle cell.’ He’s a hematologist by training and has been working with a non-profit in Zambia for the past decade, so he’s seen the need and the lack of a diagnostic tool."
When Kumar and colleagues ran tests with infected blood, their results were unmistakable. While healthy red blood cells settled in the tubes at specific levels, the dense cells from blood infected with sickle cell settled in a band significantly lower. The band of red cells could clearly be seen by eye.
Just showing that the test worked, however, wasn’t enough.
"We wanted to make the test as simple as possible," Kumar explained. "The idea was to make it something you could run from just a finger prick. Because these gradients assemble on their own, that meant we could make them in whatever volume we wanted, even a small capillary tube."
The design the team eventually settled on is barely larger than a toothpick. In the field, Kumar said, running the test is as simple as uncapping the tube, pricking a patient’s finger and allowing the blood to wick into the tube.
While further study is needed to determine how accurate and effective the test may be, Kumar said stopping even a few sickle-cell-related deaths would represent a victory.
"The best way to state it is in terms of the actual problem," he said. "About 300,000 children are born every year with sickle cell disease, and the vast majority – about 80 to 90 percent – are in either Africa or India, where for the most part, they aren’t going to get access to the current screening tests.
"There were studies recently that showed in sub-Saharan Africa, between 50 and 90 percent of the children born with sickle cell disease die before the age of 5,” he continued. “Whereas in the U.S. people don’t die from this disease as children, they can still live a full life. So my hope is that if this test is effective, it can make some small dent in those numbers.”
More information: Density-based separation in multiphase systems provides a simple method to identify sickle cell disease, PNAS, www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1414739111

mindblowingscience:

Faster, cheaper tests for sickle cell disease

Within minutes after birth, every child in the U.S. undergoes a battery of tests designed to diagnose a host of conditions, including sickle cell disease. Thousands of children born in the developing world, however, aren’t so lucky, meaning many suffer and die from the disease each year.

A.J. Kumar hopes to put a halt to at least some of those deaths.

A Post-Doctoral Fellow in Chemistry and Chemical Biology working in the lab of George Whitesides, the Woodford L. and Ann A. Flowers University Professor, Kumar and colleagues, including other co-authors, have developed a new test for sickle cell disease that provides results in just 12 minutes and costs as little as 50 cents – far faster and cheaper than other tests. The test is described in a paper published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"The tests we have today work great, they have a very high sensitivity," Kumar said. "But the equipment needed to run them costs in the tens of thousands of dollars, and they take hours to run. That’s not amenable to rural clinics, or even some cities where the medical infrastructure isn’t up to the standards we see in the U.S. That’s where having a rapid, low-cost test becomes important and this paper shows such a test can potentially work."

When run against more than 50 clinical samples – 26 positive and 26 negative – the  showed good sensitivity and specificity for the disease, Kumar said, so the early evidence is promising, but additional testing will be needed to determine whether the test is truly accurate enough to use in the field.

The test designed by Kumar is deceptively simple, and works by connecting two ideas scientists have understood for decades.

The first is the notion that blood cells affected by the disease are denser than , and the second is that many polymers, when mixed in water, automatically separate into layers ordered by density.

Conventional methods to separate cells by density relied on layering liquids with different density by hand. The insight, arrived at by Charles Mace (now at Tufts) and Kumar, was that the self-forming layers could be used to separate cells, such as , by density.

"When you mix the polymers with water, they separate just like oil and water," he said. "Even if you mix it up, it will still come back to those layers."

It wasn’t until a chance meeting with Dr. Thomas Stossel, however, that Kumar believed the technology might have a real impact on sickle cell disease.

"Initially, we started off working on malaria, because we thought when parasites invaded the cells, it would change their density," he said. "But when I met Tom Stossel on a panel at the Harvard Medical School, he said, ‘You need to work on sickle cell.’ He’s a hematologist by training and has been working with a non-profit in Zambia for the past decade, so he’s seen the need and the lack of a diagnostic tool."

When Kumar and colleagues ran tests with infected blood, their results were unmistakable. While healthy red  settled in the tubes at specific levels, the dense cells from blood infected with sickle cell settled in a band significantly lower. The band of red cells could clearly be seen by eye.

Just showing that the test worked, however, wasn’t enough.

"We wanted to make the test as simple as possible," Kumar explained. "The idea was to make it something you could run from just a finger prick. Because these gradients assemble on their own, that meant we could make them in whatever volume we wanted, even a small capillary tube."

The design the team eventually settled on is barely larger than a toothpick. In the field, Kumar said, running the test is as simple as uncapping the tube, pricking a patient’s finger and allowing the blood to wick into the tube.

While further study is needed to determine how accurate and effective the test may be, Kumar said stopping even a few sickle-cell-related deaths would represent a victory.

"The best way to state it is in terms of the actual problem," he said. "About 300,000 children are born every year with sickle cell disease, and the vast majority – about 80 to 90 percent – are in either Africa or India, where for the most part, they aren’t going to get access to the current screening tests.

"There were studies recently that showed in sub-Saharan Africa, between 50 and 90 percent of the children born with  die before the age of 5,” he continued. “Whereas in the U.S. people don’t die from this disease as children, they can still live a full life. So my hope is that if this test is effective, it can make some small dent in those numbers.”

More information: Density-based separation in multiphase systems provides a simple method to identify sickle cell disease, PNASwww.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1414739111

Source: phys.org

1st September 2014

Photoset reblogged from with 27,420 notes

Source: kim-jong-chill

1st September 2014

Photoset reblogged from It's Complicated with 474 notes

leslieseuffert:

Nikita Gill (London) Ghosts in the Woods, 2014

1st September 2014

Photo reblogged from with 782 notes

Source: cosmicwolfstorm

1st September 2014

Post reblogged from Do You Hear the People Sing? with 17,225 notes

kingjaffejoffer:

xn—78h:

I say fuck all cops because, rather than be critical and take a stand against their fellow officers, good cops are nowhere to be fucking seen when wild shit goes down.
No police officer, especially police chief, gets on the news or social media or some type of fucking platform and says shit about bad cops.
So fuck them.
Fuck them for standing in camaraderie with corrupt individuals.

Source: xn--1rw

1st September 2014

Post reblogged from with 1,163 notes

sodomymcscurvylegs:

Video games don’t have to have good graphics to be good:

image


Video games don’t have to be about combat to be good:

image


Video games don’t have to have expansive dialogue and cutscenes to tell a good story:

image


Video games don’t have to be linear to envelop players in their worlds:

image


Video game bosses don’t have to be difficult to be fun:

image


Video games don’t have to lack color simply because they are “post-apocalyptic”:

image

Video Games can have lighthearted art design and still carry deeply dark themes:

image

Rethink video games.

Source: sodomymcscurvylegs

1st September 2014

Video reblogged from PAX AMERICANA with 620 notes

wot4:

reminder that they are up to something

Source: wot4

1st September 2014

Photoset reblogged from THE DEBRIS COLLECTOR with 756 notes

archatlas:

River Structures Paul Hirzel

  • River House I ‘The Bridge’ with 2,310sqf conditioned space is the living-guest quarters and it sets approx. 12 feet above grade. A 15-foot deep steel Howe truss system spans 80 feet at the center span with 32/16 foot balancing cantilevers at each end. The steel bridge truss supports a wood lattice that shades conditioned space below.
  • River House II ‘The Lookout’ with 1,139sqf conditioned space is a multiuse space 1000 feet up river from the main structure. It is constructed with an inverted steel truss exoskeleton which cantilevers 40 feet over the river to view a rare Steelhead spawning pool below. 

Source: archatlas

1st September 2014

Photo reblogged from ken with 848 notes

amnhnyc:

How did the moon form? The leading theory is that the Moon resulted from a glancing collision between the young Earth and an object the size of Mars. The above image series is based on several mathematical simulations of the Moon’s origin:
The Moon’s history begins with a collision between a young Earth (larger object) and a Mars-sized planet.
10 minutes: The now-molten mantle layers (gray) of the two planets are mixing together.
1 hour: The iron cores (orange) are melding together – Most of this iron will remain with Earth.
2 hours: Parts of the mantle are spinning off into a swarm of debris.
22 hours: Pieces of debris revolve around Earth, slowly gathering together.
1 week: The growing Moon’s gravity pulls in the remaining debris.
Learn more about Moon rocks and craters.

amnhnyc:

How did the moon form? The leading theory is that the Moon resulted from a glancing collision between the young Earth and an object the size of Mars. The above image series is based on several mathematical simulations of the Moon’s origin:

The Moon’s history begins with a collision between a young Earth (larger object) and a Mars-sized planet.

10 minutes: The now-molten mantle layers (gray) of the two planets are mixing together.

1 hour: The iron cores (orange) are melding together – Most of this iron will remain with Earth.

2 hours: Parts of the mantle are spinning off into a swarm of debris.

22 hours: Pieces of debris revolve around Earth, slowly gathering together.

1 week: The growing Moon’s gravity pulls in the remaining debris.

Learn more about Moon rocks and craters.

Tagged: Astronomygeologyimage macroscience

Source: amnhnyc

1st September 2014

Photo reblogged from Dog Appreciation Blog with 10,708 notes

Source: smithpower